kirk_m

Grill masters ... I need your help

19 posts in this topic

Planning on doing a smoked turkey on thanksgiving. Which wood would you recommend? Any favorite spice rub?

Thanks

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Wood won't matter. Use whatever you like. Really, I bet you can't tell the difference between elder, pecan, hickory, Apple, mesquite, cherry, peach, etc. 

One rule to apply: always brine birds. Find a basic brine and go with it. I'll dig around later and see if I can find my turkey brine recipe. 

Rubs? Meh. You're not trying to create bark on a turkey like you do on pork and beef. Most rubs are going to be sugar based and end up (nearly or completely) burning. I'd probably skip the dry rub entirely. The brine will give you plenty of flavor. 

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Never have brined a bird, BGE and shoot em up with a butter based injector, Tony Cachere's  (sp) is a good one. low and slow or shoot for 350 and bake it like in an oven.

 

As far as wood, I like using Cherry or Peach doesn't tend to be as strong as Hickory or Mesquite.

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Last year I did a spatchcock turkey and was some of the best turkey I have ever eaten.  I went back and forth on brining it, but it ended up not brining just because I ran out of time.  You can use whatever non-sugar based rub you like.  Cajun seasoning or any of the dizzy pig rubs, or even a homeade rub will work well.  I cooked it at 375, but don't remember how long or to what temp, a quick look on the BGE forums will tell you though.  I always use pecan for wood because I get it for free.  I agree with JT for the most part with wood you wont tell much difference from one to the other, unless you are using something like mesquite.

 

Here it was on the grill.  Juiciest turkey I have ever eaten.  IMO no reason to do a bird low and slow.  This bird definitely took less than 2 hours.  If you are cooking on a large BGE and want to go this route, DO NOT buy a huge turkey.  This was one of the smallest turkeys I could find I wanna say it was like 12 or 13 pounds.

20141127_161442_zps5b447dd9.jpg

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Indirect with the plate setter, I never cooking anything that is going to take more than 15-20 minutes over direct heat.

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I brined it, then injected it with Tony Chacherie's creole butter marinade.  I seasoned it salt and pepper, as well as Cavender's greek seasoning, and, I have to say, it was the bomb.  Juciest, tastiest turkey I have ever eaten.  I cooked it on the egg for 3 hours at 350 to an internal temp of 170.  My wife was so used to eating the dry turkey that our mothers have always made that she wasn't sure if she liked it or not at first, because the texture was moist rather than dry and ropey.  I, however, am sold that this is the only way to do a turkey.  I smoked it using some Jack Daniel's bourbon barrel chips that I got from my brother in law, the liquor salesman :)

Edited by kirk_m

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What lump charcoal are you guys using? The one i used to use disappeared and i have been using the Green Egg charcoal. That stuff burns up really quick. 

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This time, I used green egg brand.  But, usually, I am using Cowboy brand, or something like that, from Rouses' since I have to go out of my way to get to the store that sells the green egg stuff.  THe problem with the cowboy brand stuff is that most of it is freaking branches, and it is harder to light.

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I use only Primo brand charcoal. After my only experience using something else, I'll never stray again. It lights fast, burns hot, produces little ash, and lasts a long time. The other stuff that I used took forever to get hot, didn't get as hot when I wanted it, burnt faster, and produced a ton more ash. Spend the money and try the Primo charcoal. 

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Where do you buy it?

I buy mine from Tramonte's in BR. Google around for a Primo dealer near you. They should carry the charcoal too. Call and ask. 

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I do not like the cowboy charcoal. It gives a much different taste to the food IMO. I used to get Wicked from ace in metairie but i havent seen it there in a while. I havent found much of a selection for charcoal in my area. 

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Dave, probably because it looks like it's made from
Pine branches. I agree, it isn't as good as premium coals.

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I was buying bayou classic charcoal for a little bit until I got half of a bag of briquettes mixed in with the lump 

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I'm a little late to the party for this one but I though I would chime in... When I do a turkey in my smoker I do a brown sugar and maple syrup brine overnight, I inject with creole butter, and then use a wet rub which is a combination of grill mates pork dry rub and pure maple syrup, all over and under the breast skin.  I then smoke the turkey with apple wood.  The result is a very sweet and succulent turkey.  Using a sticky wet rub like the syrup creates a better surface for the smoke to adhere to which emphasizes the flavor of the apple wood.  Very similar to forming a pellicle when smoking fish.  Lastly I cannot comment on the charcoal as I use an electric smoker. 

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